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Compliance

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You obtain an immigration status in the U.S. through admission at a port of entry or by approval of an application to USCIS. Your status is also referred to as “visa status” or “nonimmigrant status”. A visa is an entry document only. You can have more than one entry visa in your passport (Canadians are exempt from the visa requirement) but you can enter the U.S. in only one status.

The status in which you are admitted by an immigration officer is stamped in your passport and recorded electronically if entering by air. Land borders issue a paper I-94 record. If your status is approved by USCIS as a change from another status, your I-94 card will be part of the USCIS approval notice (I-797 Notice of Action form).

 

It is your responsibility to comply with the federal regulations and to maintain your J-1 visa status.  

It is important not to violate any of the provisions of your visa status so you can keep your focus on the academic and professional objectives for which you came. The following pages should help you be aware of what you need to do — and what you should not do — to maintain your legal status.

J-1 guidelines to maintaining lawful status

It is important not to violate any of the provisions of your visa status so you can keep your focus on the academic and professional objectives for which you came. These guidelines should help you be aware of what you need to do — and should not do — to maintain your legal status.

J-1 medical insurance

U.S. Department of State regulations require all J-1 scholars to have medical insurance for themselves and any accompanying J-2 family members for the duration of their program.

J-1 Out of Country status

The SEVIS Out of Country designation allows ISSC to indicate exchange visitor records as “active” during periods outside the U.S. of longer than 30 days. Official exchange program activities must require scholars to travel outside of the U.S. to participate in collaborative research projects or associated program activities.

Extending your J-1 status

If you need to extend your stay in the U.S., your host department will submit an application for an extension of your status directly to ASU ISSC.

J-1 scholar FAQs

Questions asked frequently by our J-1 scholars.